Friday, October 3, 2014

Code.org - New K-5 Curriculum

New K-5 Curriculum!

Looking for a fun, engaging way to teach problem solving, collaboration, and STEM skills?  Check out the new Code.org K-5 curriculum.  From pre-readers to 5th grade, this free curriculum takes students through off line and online activities that are fun and engaging in order for them to learn the real world skill of basic coding.  The best part - as a teacher, you do not need to know ANYTHING about coding!

Check it out at http://code.org/educate/k5

They also offer an introduction course for K-8th grade and many other curriculum resources.

Mark your calendars for the hour of code week! 

Computer science is foundational for all students today. Yet 90% of schools don't teach it. Last December, 15 million students tried computer science in one week, thanks to educators like you! Since then, over 40 million students have tried the Hour of Code. Please help this grassroots, teacher-driven campaign reach 100 million students by the end of the year. Sign up to participate in Hour of Code 2014 during December 8-14, Computer Science Education Week.

Let's all learn together!

Code.org's Educational Philosophy

We believe that:
  1. There is more to computer science than coding; we’re just called Code.org because it’s short and snappy.
  2. Students should learn the why of computer science, not just the what and how.
  3. Technology should be used to allow a teacher to do what they do best, which is why we promote a Blended Learning model (not just for students, but for teacher PD as well).
  4. Learning computer science is useful no matter what field a student eventually goes into.
  5. The best learning is relevant and active.
  6. Computer science is creative and exciting, and you can use it to make the world a better place.
  7. Students are diverse, both in their prior knowledge and their needs as learners. They deserve to learn in an environment that is equitable and accessible.
  8. Failure is good. Students need to learn how to persevere in solving difficult problems.
  9. Bringing computer science to K-12 schools nationwide is something that we’ll achieve by all working together. It won’t be one person or one organization.
  10. It doesn't matter if you’re 8 years old, an 8th grade teacher, or 80 years old; anyone can learn computer science.